The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

I was pretty reluctant to read The Hate U Give. Angie Thomas’s debut (named after Tupac’s Thug Life tattoo) has gained a lot of press for being a novel about police brutality towards African American teens. But the special part about The Hate U Give isn’t the premise- it’s that it was written for teens. Yet, I was not drawn towards this novel. To me, it seemed like Thomas didn’t know how to connect with a teen audience when talking about systemic racism, so she turned what should have been a collection of essays into a novel. But, after some pushing from friends, I put my assumptions aside and picked up The Hate U Give. I couldn’t be happier I did.

While The Hate U Give does have a few rough, lecture-y moments, overall Thomas’ novel is a compelling, well written, and a well needed political commentary. I laughed out loud, cried, and bit my lip with the protagonist, Starr, while she was dealing with issues from the changing dynamic between her and her (white) boyfriend to the aftermath of her unarmed friend, Khalil, being shot by a cop. While educating me, The Hate U Give simultaneously forced me to confront my own privilege and acknowledge how situations Starr was put in would would go differently for me solely because of my lighter skin tone. Whatever the situation, Starr dishes out realness while she struggles with problems that are ordinary and extraordinary.

“Funny how it works with white kids though. It’s dope to be black until it’s hard to be black”

The Hate U Give should be required reading in every high school. Many classics like 1984 and The Handmaid’s Tale have recently sprung to the front of reading lists. The Hate U Give deserves to be among them. While Thomas’s novel is not about dystopic, totalitarian societies, it is still an impressive new piece of political commentary. The Hate U Give teaches teens about the racism many of their peers face, while also urging them to confront their own privilege. Right now, we must to listen to stories like Starr and Khalil’s.

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